READ OUR NEWEST NEWSLETTER

Click the gray arrows on the left and right sides of the page to flip through the pages, or click on the image to make it full screen.

HEAR FROM OUR SCHOLARS

Scholarship Students Worldwide

4 schools of medical care provided on medical missions

Service trips conducted

%

Wealth increase for scholarship graduates

Patients served on Medical Missions

3 service groups can complete a home

FROM OUR VOLUNTEERS

 

I’m so happy that I went on this trip. The joy that people have in Guatemala is incredible. It’s bittersweet: When I went to Guatemala and I was serving people, it was the happiest I’ve ever been in my life, and I don’t know if I’ll ever be that happy again.

Anonymous, Marian High School

GUATEMALA, February 2019

Medical Missions like this allow you to come home and look at your own patients a different way. I think it’s very rewarding, both personally and professionally.

Dr. Harry Carr, M.D.

GUATEMALA, Summer 2017

We did this exercise where we had to buy a week’s worth of groceries on $7, and it was absolutely eye-opening. It was really hard, and what I came up with wasn’t food that I wanted to eat. But that’s the reality for them. I get a Starbucks every morning that costs as much as their food for their whole family for the whole week.

Anonymous, Saint Michael's Catholic Academy

GUATEMALA, January 2019

Full Financial Transparency

We want our supporters to be confident that every dollar that they invest is going toward a good cause. To see our most recent financial documents, click here.

International Samaritan in the News

Learn more about International Samaritan’s press coverage, campaigns, and community involvement.

Note: We are committed to respecting and uplifting our scholars. Due to some stories containing sensitive information, we redact or change the names of the scholars, their parents, their schools, and other details that could compromise their anonymity.

A Letter from Emanuel

Hello, I am Emanuel. I am 20 years old.

When I was in my mother’s womb, she did not want me to be born, so she hit her belly and took medication to cause a miscarriage, but I was born anyway. However, I was so badly damaged that when I was born I had to be hospitalized for two years and I still have physical deformities. When I was young, my mother hit me a lot, and she didn’t take care of me. By the time I was three, I had to feed myself every day; by the time I was five, I was in charge of all the cooking and cleaning for the whole house.

When I was five, my mother finally left me. She changed her name and fled to the United States. Soon after my father left, too, to be with another woman that he was seeing. He left me on the doorstep of my mother’s old boss.  I hoped that things would be better with her, but she also treated me badly. I remember that once she broke my head with a stone and put corn on my head so the birds and chickens would attack me. By the time I was six I wanted to die, and I began to plan how I could kill myself.

My aunt first started coming to see me on the weekends when I was seven years old. Until then, she had lived far away. Even though she couldn’t afford to keep me, she wanted me a lot. She did not hurt me and she took care of my injuries. She begged my dad’s parents to adopt me, and one day she finally convinced them to rescue me from the hell I was living.  When she and my paternal grandparents arrived to bring me home, they found me all naked and dirty. That was the day that my life changed, when my grandparents legally adopted me. They were very nice to me: They took me to the doctor for my injuries, they bought me clothes and shoes, they cut my hair, and after two years of preparation they put me in school with other people my age.

We thought that I would have to stop attending school after sixth grade because it became too expensive, but when I was ready for high school, International Samaritan found me. They gave me the resources to continue schooling. Thank God for this program that has helped me, not only in study but also in moral and psychological ways. Little by little I have changed, because this program believes in the young people who benefit from it. Thanks to International Samaritan my dream to graduate has come true, and I now have the opportunity to go to university. My hope is to get a degree in auditing and form my own company. Finally, my future seems bright.

No Results Found

The page you requested could not be found. Try refining your search, or use the navigation above to locate the post.

president’s blog

What’s the Worst Job You’ve Ever Had?

I’ve written before about the best job I ever had, but the worst job is a whole different story.  

The worst job I’ve ever had has been the work of finding a job.  Twice in my life, I’ve lost a job. Both times came as a complete surprise, not only to me but also to my three kids and wife (who was staying at home with them at the time).  

Looking for work stinks.  It’s like standing behind the fence at a water park and seeing your friends floating down the lazy river while you’re trying to find a swimsuit and some money to get in, with neither of them in sight.

I’ve had difficult jobs before.  I did ten hour shifts in an auto parts assembly shop in the summer of ’88 when the temperatures stayed in the 90’s and the shop was hotter than that.  I picked grapes on a farm in Israel one summer where we worked 13 hour days for one month straight. Since college, I’ve worked in places where conflict-averse leaders allowed a culture of petulant conflict to reign.  But man, they were jobs. And no matter how bad things were around me, I went home at night feeling good about the fact that I worked another day and was going to get paid for it. I can’t say that I ever really had a bad job other than the work of looking for work without one.

St. John Paul II wrote in On Human Work, “Work is a good thing for man–a good thing for his humanity–because through work man not  only transforms nature, adapting it to his own needs, but he also achieves fulfillment as a human being and indeed, in a sense, becomes ‘more a  human being.’”

Last week, Pope Francis spoke to thousands of rock cutters in Madagascar about the dignity of work.  He was speaking to people who were paid very little but made more shaping rock than they did picking garbage in the dump next to the mountain.  And the Pope told them that what they are doing “is a song of hope that refutes and silences any suggestion that some things are inevitable. ‘Let us say it forcefully: Poverty is not inevitable!’”

As a supporter of International Samaritan, you have the opportunity to show that poverty is not inevitable.  You can help the children growing up near a dump to get out of a life toiling in it and into a school and job consistent with their gifts and dreams. 

Pope Francis addressing the rock cutters in Madagascar.
Photo by Alessandra Tarantino.

It’s as easy as going to our donate page to help a young one through grade school or an older one through college.  Be the song of hope for them that says forcefully, poverty is not inevitable.

Pictured above are four of our graduates from around the world. From top left to bottom right, we have Josefa, employed an accountant; Rahel, employed as a teacher; Miguel, employed as a mechanic; and Teddy, employed as a driver.

What would you eat on $2 per day?

It wasn’t until I became a father that I realized how important food is to one’s emotional well-being.  Growing up, three square meals a day were just always there for me, not much different than having clean water to drink.  I just took food for granted. But when my...

What’s the Best Job You’ve Ever Had?

Mike at his old favorite job, taken in 1999. For me, that answer has always been easy.  For a couple of seasons before law school, and two glorious seasons after it, I sold ice cream at the Joe Louis Arena for the Detroit Red Wings. I made about a hundred bucks a...

About Us

International Samaritan is a nonprofit organization with the designation 501(c)(3). Our headquarters is located in Ann Arbor Michigan.

View our Privacy Policy.

info@intsam.org

(734) 222-0701

803 N Main St, Ann Arbor, MI 48104

M-F: 9am-5pm, S-S: Closed